The Health Benefits of Buckwheat

Buckwheat

Buckwheat. Photo by llsimon53


Buckwheat is the hearty, working-man’s crop that thrives in poor soil conditions, freezing temperatures, droughts, and excess rains. Buckwheat is resistant to damage and is therefore relatively inexpensive and easy to grow.

Buckwheat is native to Northern Europe and Asia and eventually spread to Europe and Russia in the 14th and 15th centuries, and was introduced to the United States by the Dutch during the 17th century.

BuckwheatIt may surprise some people to learn that buckwheat is actually a fruit even though it is commonly thought to be a grain. Buckwheat is a fruit seed that is related to rhubarb and sorrel.

Whole buckwheat is a very nutritious food. The protein in buckwheat contains the eight essential amino acids and is also high in lysine. Buckwheat is also rich in many B vitamins as well as phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper and manganese. Buckwheat is also a good oil source of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which is one of the two essential fatty acids we must have to be healthy.

Health Benefits of Buckwheat

  • Buckwheat is high in fiber. 1 cup of cooked buckwheat groats contains over 4 grams of dietary fiber.
  • Buckwheat contains the eight essential amino acids.
  • Buckwheat contains many minerals including: phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper and manganese.
  • Buckwheat contains a rich supply of flavonoids, particularly rutin.
  • Buckwheat lowers glucose levels and is beneficial for managing diabetes.
  • Buckwheat has been found to lower blood pressure and reduce cholesterol.
  • Buckwheat is a fruit seed and is a gluten-free alternative to grains.

Dietary Uses of Buckwheat
Buckwheat flour has a strong, distinctive flavor and is often mixed with other flours to lend its distinctive taste to many baked goods. Buckwheat comes in a few different forms for dietary consumption:

  • Buckwheat Groats are the hulled grains of buckwheat; they are three-sided in shape and
    resemble grains of wheat, oats, or rye. Kasha is a traditional porridge made from buckwheat groats. Buckwheat groats are used whole in hot cereals and soups. The triangular seeds from buckwheat can be used to make flour after being removed from the husk.
  • Buckwheat Flour is commonly used to make buckwheat pancakes, hot cereals, and soups. Buckwheat flour is mixed with whole wheat flour to make breads, muffins and biscuits.
  • Buckwheat Noodles or Soba noodles (soba, the Japanese name for buckwheat). These thin noodles are made from buckwheat flour and are typically served chilled with a sauce or in a hot broth like a soup.

Storage
Buckwheat should be stored in an airtight container which is kept in a cool dry place. Buckwheat flour should be always stored in the refrigerator, while other buckwheat products should be kept refrigerated if you live in a warm climate or during periods of warmer weather. Whole buckwheat can last up to 1 year if stored properly. Buckwheat flour will keep fresh for several months.

Further Reading

11 thoughts on “The Health Benefits of Buckwheat

  1. Hey Mr. HealthyReader:

    I’m sure you have plenty of topics queued up, but could you add the benifits of blueberries and spinach? I’ve heard that both of these are very healthy foods.

    Also, sometime could you give a day in the life, or a week in the life, to the eating habits of the HealthyReader author? I was just curious about the number of meals you would typically eat per day, what are the meals, snacks, etc…

    Thanks!

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  3. my name is Sandra,I am very pleased to discover products from the health food store.I suffered from bloating,gas,and headache.since one of my sisters in christ told me about:buckweat,quinoa, millet,etc… I am a new person meaning:no gas,no bloating,no headache.Every day I eat organic food and always eating raw greens,raw nuts, vegetables and fruits. I know for sure many people who has variety of deases and continue to go be on medications just because of their ignorance.

  4. Pingback: GF Gingerbread House | Adventures of a Gluten Free Mom

  5. Hello,
    This is a great website for good information and interesting Posts to read.
    A site that is a must for a revisit.

    Regards,
    Maurice Jacob.

  6. courteny on

    To the pregnant reader:
    I know this post is an old one, but for the new readers, yes, pregnant women can eat buckwheat. Women with child can eat any fruit/vegetable of the earth that is safe for un-pregnant people. You only need to be careful of taking herbal supplements, as the babies within our womb are not used to taking a high concentration of anything. Most herbs, however, taken in natural form (basil, parsely, oregano, etc) are healthy and recommended.

  7. Christine on

    Was looking for information on the health benefits of buckwheat. Thanks so much for your clear list, it’s exactly what I wanted. Very interesting and useful web site!

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  9. I recently ate a delicious soup at a Japanese Restaurant which contained buckwheat noodles. A very pleasant tasting noodle. Where can I buy it?

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  11. Ofcourse, you can buy buckwheat noodles.pasta and bread at whole foods market in the UK which are located in High Street Kensington, Soho,Clapham Juntion,Camdan Town and Stock Newington.

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  13. Lee on

    I have been looking for healthy things with fiber to add to my recipes because my husband is diabetic. He tries to eat healthy to control his blood glucose level. He doesn’t want to take pills so the fiber helps so much. Buckwheat sounds like it is worth finding recipes for. Thanks for your help

  14. bharat khatwani on

    Is Buckwheat easy to digest?I have Inguinal Hernia.I am looking for alternatives of wheat/rice which are easy to digest so that strain on bowels is reduced,which in turn is helpful for Hernia.Pl. guide

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